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Dandie Dinmont Terrier

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier, a short-legged dog with a longish body and round, expressive eyes, poses a striking look indeed. Its USP lies in the top knot on its head made with strands of hair, taking its cuteness to another level.

The breed gets its name after Dandie Dinmont, a fictional character in Sir Walter Scott’s famous novel Guy Mannering. As per the book, Dandie Dinmont kept a pack of six working dogs, Old Pepper, Old Mustard, Young Mustard, Young Pepper, Little Pepper, and Little Mustard. “Pepper” and “Mustard” are the breed’s colorations at present, while the farmer’s name eventually became the identity of the breed.

Besides a loyal family pet, the Dandie excels to the stature of a confident watch and guard dog, intimating its masters with a loud baritone bark of any impending danger.

Breed Characteristics

  • Other Names:Dandie, Hindlee Terrier
  • Colors:Pepper, mustard
  • Life Expectancy:11 – 13 years
  • Height:8 – 11 inches
  • Weight:18 – 24 pounds
  • Temperament:Lively, affectionate, independent
  • Good with Kids:Yes
  • Exercise requirements:High
  • Hypoallergenic:Yes
  • Litter Size:3 – 6 puppies
  • Barking Capacity:Moderate; emits a high-pitched bark on sensing danger
  • Health Problems:Glaucoma, intervertebral disc disease, portosystemic shunt
  • Trainability:Moderate
  • Origin:Scotland
Dandie Dinmont Terrier Dog
Dandie Dinmont Terrier Puppies

Dandie Dinmont Terrier’s History: Timeline

    1600s

    Was used for hunting badgers, and otters

    1700s

    Written history of this breed obtained, and they were known to be owned by the Allans of the Holystone village in England’s Northumberland

    1815

    The breed received recognition outside its native land through Sir Walter Scott’s novel Guy Mannering

    1873

    The Kennel Club of UK formed

    1875

    Formation of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club (DDTC)

    1886

    Attained the American Kennel Club’s recognition

    1918

    Recognized by the United Kennel Club

    1929

    The Scottish Dandie Dinmont Society merged with Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club

    2003

    Their numbers in the United Kingdom had drastically declined, with 21 puppies registered only, 18 of which were male.

    2006

    There was a slight increase in the numbers of these dogs.

    2010

    The Kennel Club registered 151 puppies in total, the highest in the last 10 years

Dandie Dinmont Terrier Size
Dandie Dinmont Terrier Images

Care

These active dogs need moderately high exercise to keep fit and in proper shape. A 20-minute walk once or twice a day, with sufficient playtimes like a ball game within a fenced yard or garden, would for sure suffice. Since they are low-built dogs with a longish body, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier cannot run for prolonged hours, so avoid over-exercising them.

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier has a double coat, soft, waterproof undercoat, and a hard, silky outer coat forming into a top knot on its head. So, these low shedding dogs need regular grooming to look clean. Brush them at least four times a week to prevent their long coat from getting matted or tangled. Use a pin brush or medium-toothed comb for the purpose.

Stripping their coat three to four times in a year, either manually or mechanically, would help them appear neat and tidy. You could also pluck a few of its long hairs from its coat gently using your forefinger or thumb or even take a groomer’s help in this regard.

Do not forget to trim your pet’s toenails once a month and clean its eyes and ears at least once a week.

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier’s diet should comprise good quality dry dog food, either homemade or store-bought. When going for commercially manufactured ones, Zignature and Primal Freeze are the preferred options.

The Dandie Dinmont terrier is sweet and intelligent. Still, at the same time, they have a mind of their own, ending up being stubborn and independent. Small dog syndrome is another trait one could find in them, trying to challenge any big dog that comes in its way, forgetting its small size. So, impart command training since its puppy days. In this way, your dog would eventually get disciplined and lessen its willful behavior.

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