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Jagdterrier

The Jagdterrier, interestingly pronounced as “Yack Terrier,” can amuse anyone with its exceptional hunting skills. It has the reputation of pulling wild boars and rabbits out of their dens, and blood tracking a wounded game, living up to the German meaning of its name “hunt terrier.” This black-and-tan dog poses a cute look with its deep, expressive oval eyes, and sharp, erect ears. It would fit the bill if you are on the lookout for a small companion for your apartment and a friendly pet for your kid, bubbling with energy, high on watching and guarding skills.

Breed Characteristics

  • Other Names:
    German hunting terrier, German hunt terrier, German Jagdterrier,  Deutsche Jagdterrier 
  • Colors:Black and tan, black and gray, brown
  • Life Expectancy:10 – 12 years
  • Height:13 – 16 inches (at the shoulder)
  • Weight:Male: 20 – 22 pounds
    Female: 17 – 19 pounds
  • Temperament:Courageous, friendly, reliable
  • Good with Kids:Yes
  • Exercise requirements:
    High
  • Hypoallergenic:No
  • Litter Size:3 – 6 puppies
  • Barking Capacity:Excessive (to entertain, seek attention or protest)
  • Health Problems:
    Primary lens luxation, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism
  • Trainability:Moderate
  • Origin:
    Germany

Jagdterrier’s History: Timeline

    1920

    Hunters Walter Zangenberg, Carl-Erich Grünewald, and Rudolf Frieß separated from the Fox Terrier Club to develop a new hunting breed

    1921 -1925

    Four black-and-tan dogs with the Fox Terrier’s lineage became the Jagdterrier’s foundation stock. The Welsh Terrier and Old English Wirehaired Terrier were included in the intensive breeding process

    1926

    The German Hunting Terrier Club formed

    1938-1954

    Enthusiasts like Max Theil and Armin Schwarz Sr. brought some Jagdterriers to the US.

    1956

    The Jagdterrier Club of America formed to acquire AKC’s recognition for the breed

    1993

    Recognized by the UKC

    2014

    Included in the AKC’s Foundation Stock Service (FSS)

Jagdterrier Puppies
Deutsche Jagdterrier

Care

Your active Jagdterrier needs many short walks, teamed with ample playtime in a fenced backyard to help burn out its energy better. If you live in an apartment, find unique games to keep it busy like rolling-a-ball, crossing an obstacle, hide and seek, and so on. Making it walk many times in the hallway would suffice if going out becomes difficult during harsh weather conditions. Another way to ensure physical fitness is by training for agility, rally, obedience, barn hunts, and other dog sports.

he Jagdterrier has a plain and dense coat that could be hard to rough or coarse to smooth.Fortunately, you do not have to work too hard to groom it.Brush it weekly or bi-weekly during the shedding season, when you could find a lot of hair scattered here and there. To make it appear spick and span bathe it monthly or on occasions when it has gotten really dirty. Else, a rub down using a damp washcloth would be fine. Trimming its nails, brushing its teeth, and cleaning its ears are the other routine hygiene measures to follow.

Give a protein and fat-filled diet to your Jagdterrier to help maintain its high energy levels. If you are going for store-bought food, then Merrick Grain Free, and Purina Pro Plan are among the better options.

The Jagdterrier is active, intelligent, and loyal, responding well to short, innovative sessions, rather than monotonous and lengthy ones. Their hunting lineage makes them good chasers, so teach the puppies to wear a leash and follow the basic commands like “Stay” or “Stop.” If not socialized, they will show aggression with other dogs because of their high prey drive. They are even a mismatch for households with cats and smaller pets like rabbits.

German Jagdterrier
German Hunting Terrier

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